• Core service: Acupuncture

  • Acupuncture is the insertion of thin, disposable stainless steel needles through the skin at specific sites to regulate the body´s qi, i.e. oxygen, blood circulation, nerve impulses, hormones, etc. According to Traditional Chinese Medical Theory, qi flows throughout the body in a network of channels and vessels.

    Acupuncture serves to harmonize and distribute the qi to areas of the body that contain blockages or deficiencies in order to facilitate the healing process. Recently, the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the World Health Organizations (WHO) recognized the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating many conditions.

  • Auxiliary services: Herbs, Cupping, Scraping, Infrared Heating, Electroacupuncture, Blood letting, Acupressure etc.

  • Herbal medicine, also known as herbalism or botanical medicine, is a medical system based on the use of plants or plant extracts that may be eaten or applied to the skin. Since ancient times, herbal medicine has been used by many different cultures throughout the world to treat illness and to assist bodily functions. While herbal medicine is not a licensed profession in the United States, herbal remedies in the form of extracts, tinctures, capsules and tablets as well as teas may be recommended by healthcare practitioners of many different disciplines as a practical way to address a wide variety of medical conditions.

    Scrapping, also known as Gua Sha, is a healing technique used in Asia by practitioners of Traditional Medicine, in both the clinical setting and in homes, but little known in the West. It involves palpation and cutaneous stimulation where the skin is pressured, in strokes, by a round-edged instrument; that results in the appearance of small red petechiae called 'sha', that will fade in 2 to 3 days.

    Raising Sha removes blood stagnation considered pathogenic, promoting normal circulation and metabolic processes.The patient experiences immediate relief from pain, stiffness, fever, chill, cough, nausea, and so on. Gua Sha is valuable in the prevention and treatment of acute infectious illness, upper respiratory and digestive problems, and many other acute or chronic disorders.

    Cupping is one of the oldest methods of traditional Chinese medicine. The earliest recorded use of cupping dates to the early fourth century, when the noted herbalist Ge Hong wrote about a form of cupping in A Handbook of Prescriptions. Later books written during the Tang and Qing dynasties described cupping in great detail; one textbook included an entire chapter on “fire jar qi,” a type of cupping that could alleviate headaches, dizziness and abdominal pain. Originally, practitioners would use hollowed-out animal horns for cups, and place them over particular points or meridians. Today, most acupuncturists use cups made of thick glass or plastic, although bamboo, iron and pottery cups are still used in other countries. Glass cups are the preferred method of delivery, because they do not break as easily as pottery or deteriorate like bamboo, and they allow the acupuncturist to see the skin and evaluate the effects of treatment.

    All services are provided in private treatment rooms.

    Besides acupuncture, acupuncturists will determine whether the patients need auxiliary services and which auxiliary service(s) are needed.